Home


Hypercrosslinked Polymeric Networks and Adsorbing Materials - Synthesis, Properties, Structure, and Applications

Vadim Davankov and Maria P. Tsyurupa 
Elsevier  January 2011  



Hardcover  672 pp  ISBN 9780444537003      £155.00
  • First book describing the theory, practice of preparation and use of polymeric adsorbing materials with the emphasis on new hypercrosslinked polystyrene-type polymers
  • Written by the originators of the concept of hypercrosslinked polymers
  • Complex phenomena are explained by appealing to common sense, analogies and well-known effects, rather than complex mathematical treatment and computer modelling
  • Reviews many Russian, German and even Czech language publications
  • Contains numerous experimental data in the form of Figures and Tables

Hypercrosslinked network polymers present a new class of polymeric materials with very wide application possibilities, including adsorption technology, ion exchange, HPLC, analytical chemistry, nanotechnology (nanocomposites), medical polymers.

Contents

INTRODUCTION

PART I. KNOWN TYPES OF POLYSTYRENE NETWORKS

1. GEL-TYPE (HOMOGENEOUS) POLYSTYRENE NETWORKS
1.1. Gel-type styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers by free radical copolymerization 1.1.1. Monomer reactivity ratio in crosslinking copolymerization 1.1.2. Monomer reactivity ratios of styrene and divinylbenzene isomers 1.2. Gel-type styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers by anionic copolymerization 1.2.1. Synthesis of model €ideal€ styrene-divinylbenzene networks by anionic block-copolymerization 1.2.2. Verification of swelling theory 1.2.3. Characterization of model networks by small angle neutron scattering (SANS) technique 1.2.4. Presumptive mechanism of swelling of model networks 1.2.5. Interpenetration of polymeric coils in model networks 1.2.6. Study of model networks by the other methods 1.3. Gel-type ion exchange resins

2. INTERPENETRATING POLYSTYRENE NETWORKS
2.1. Interpenetrating styrene-divinylbenzene networks 2.2. Interpenetrating ion exchange resins

3. MACROPOROUS (HETEROGENEOUS) POLYSTYRENE NETWORKS
3.1. Macroporous styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers 3.1.1. Determination of the porous structure parameters 3.1.2. Phase separation during the crosslinking copolymerization in the presence of diluents 3.1.3. Formation of macroporous copolymers in the presence of precipitating diluents 3.1.3.1. Experimental findings 3.1.3.2. Formation of macroporous texture in the presence of precipitating diluents 3.1.4. Formation of macroporous copolymers in the presence of solvating diluents 3.1.5. Formation of macroporous copolymers in the presence of linear polystyrene 3.2. Macroporous ion exchange resins

4. GIGAPOROUS POLYMERIC SEPARATING MEDIA
4.1. Formation of gigaporous texture in the presence of solid porogens 4.2. Formation of gigaporous texture by polymerization of reversed emulsions 4.3. Porous polymeric monolith 4.3.1. In situ preparation of porous continuous polymeric beds 4.3.2. Polymeric monoliths in chromatography and electrochromatography

5. ISOPOROUS ANION EXCHANGE RESINS

References to PART I

PART II. HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYSTYRENE NETWORKS

6. PREPARATION OF MACRONET ISOPOROUS AND HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYSTYRENE NETWORKS
6.1. Basic principles of formation of hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks 6.2. Crosslinking agents and chemistry of post-crosslinking 6.3. New terms for polymeric networks 6.4. Synthesis of macronet isoporous and hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks 6.4.1. Choice of solvents and catalysts 6.4.2. Synthesis conditions of macronet isoporous and hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks 6.4.3. FTIR spectra of hypercrosslinked polystyrenes. 6.4.4. Some chemical groups in the structure of hypercrosslinked polystyrene 6.4.5. Synthesis of hypercrosslinked networks in the presence of aqueous solutions of Friedel-Crafts catalysts

7. PROPERTIES OF HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYSTYRENE
7.1. Factors determining the swelling behavior of hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks 7.1.1. The influence of dilution of the initial system 7.1.2. The role of the initial copolymer network 7.1.3. Influence of the uniformity of crosslink distribution 7.1.4. The role of inner stresses of the hypercrosslinked network and the structure of crosslinking bridges 7.1.5. The role of the reaction rate of polystyrene with crosslinking agents 7.1.6. The effect of the reaction medium 7.1.7. The influence of polystyrene molecular weight 7.2. Kinetics of swelling of hypercrosslinked polystyrene 7.3. Some remarks concerning the swelling ability of three-dimensional polymers 7.4. Swelling and deformation of hypercrosslinked networks 7.4.1. Physical background of photoelasticity phenomenon 7.4.2. Visualization of inner stresses in networks on swelling 7.5. Porosity of hypercrosslinked polystyrene 7.5.1. Apparent density of hypercrosslinked polystyrenes 7.5.2. Apparent inner surface area of hypercrosslinked polystyrenes 7.5.3. Pore volume of hypercrosslinked polymers 7.5.4. Pore size and pore size distribution of hypercrosslinked polystyrenes Low temperature adsorption of nitrogen Mercury intrusion Inversed size exclusion chromatography Annihilation of positronium Miscellaneous techniques 7.6. Morphology of hypercrosslinked polystyrenes 7.6.1. Investigation of polymer texture by electron microscopy 7.6.2. Investigation of hypercrosslinked polystyrenes by small angle X-ray scattering 7.7. Biporous hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks 7.8. Thermomechanical properties of hypercrosslinked polystyrene 7.8.1. Thermomechanical tests and the physical state of hypercrosslinked networks 7.8.2. Thermodilatometric analysis of hypercrosslinked polymers 7.8.3. Thermal stability of hypercrosslinked polystyrene 7.9. Deswelling of porous network polymers

8. SOLUBLE INTRAMOLECULARLY HYPERCROSSLINKED NANOSPONGES
8.1. Intramolecular crosslinking of polystyrene coils 8.2. Properties of polystyrene nanosponges 8.3. Self-assembling of nanosponges to regular clusters

9. HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYMERS € A NOVEL CLASS OF POLYMERIC MATERIALS
9.1. Distinguishing structural features of hypercrosslinked polystyrene networks 9.2. Unusual structure-property relations for hypercrosslinked polystyrene 9.3. Other types of hypercrosslinked networks 9.3.1. Macroporous hypercrosslinked styrene-divinylbenzene copolymers and related networks 9.3.2. Hypercrosslinked polysulfone 9.3.3. Hypercrosslinked polyarylates 9.3.4. Hypercrosslinked polyxylylene 9.3.5. Hypercrosslinked polyanilines 9.3.6. Hypercrosslinked polyamide and polyimide networks 9.3.7. Hydrophilic hypercrosslinked pyridine-containing polymers 9.3.8. Other types of hypercrosslinked organic polymers 9.3.9. Hypercrosslinked polysilsesquioxane networks 9.3.10. Metal-organic frameworks 9.4. Commercially available hypercrosslinked polystyrene resins

References to PART II

PART III. APPLICATION OF HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYSTYRENE ADSORBING MATERIALS

10. SORPTION OF GASES AND ORGANIC VAPORS
10.1. Polymeric adsorbents versus activated carbons 10.2. Analysis of adsorption isotherms on hypercrosslinked polystyrenes 10.3. Sorption of organic vapors under static conditions 10.4. Kinetics of sorption of hydrocarbon vapors 10.5. Sorption of hydrocarbon vapors under dynamic conditions 10.6. Desorption of hydrocarbons 10.7. Passivity of hypercrosslinked sorbents 10.8. Evaluation of adsorption activity of hypercrosslinked sorbents by means of gas chromatography

11. SORPTION OF ORGANIC COMPOUNDS FROM AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS
11.1. Sorption of organic synthetic dyes 11.2. Sorption of tributyl ester of phosphoric acid 11.3. Sorption of n-valeric acid 11.4. Clarification of colored fermentation liquids 11.5. Sorption of lipids 11.6. Sorption of gasoline 11.7. Sorption of phenols 11.8. Removal of chloroform from industrial waste water 11.9. Sorption of pesticides 11.10. Extraction of caffeine from coffee beans 11.11. Decolorizing aqueous sugar syrups 11.12. Removal of bitterness from citrus juice 11.13. Sorption of cephalosporin C 11.14. Sorption of miscellaneous organic compounds 11.15. Hypercrosslinked sorbents versus Amberlite XAD-4 11.16. Sorption of inorganic cations

12. NANOPOROUS ADSORBING MATERIALS IN SIZE-EXCLUSION CHROMATOGRAPHY OF MINERAL ELECTROLYTES
12.1. Development of the chromatographic separations of mineral electrolytes under conditions excluding ion exchange. Related work by others 12.2. Preparative separation of electrolytes via ion size exclusion (ISE) on neutral nanoporous materials 12.3. Remarkable features of size-exclusion chromatography 12.4. Size of hydrated ions 12.5. Selectivity of separation in ion size exclusion 12.6. Phase distribution of ions between aqueous solutions and nanoporous materials 12.7. Conception of €ideal separation process€ 12.8. Size-exclusion chromatography € a general approach to separation of electrolytes 12.8.1. Use of other microporous column packings 12.8.2. Productivity of ion size exclusion process 12.8.3. Ion size exclusion € green technology 12.9. Application niche for size-exclusion chromatography of electrolytes 12.10. Chromatographic resolution of a salt into its parent acid and base constituents

13. HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYSTYRENE AS COLUMN PACKING MATERAL IN HPLC
13.1. Macroporous polystyrene versus silica-based HPLC packings 13.2. Hypercrosslinked polystyrene as restricted access adsorption material 13.3. Ion exchanging and metal complexing ability of hypercrosslinked polystyrene 13.4. ?-?-Interaction selectivity in HPLC on hypercrosslinked polystyrene 13.4.1. Reversed phase chromatography 13.4.2. Quasi-normal phase chromatography 13.4.3. Mixed-mode chromatography

14. SOLID-PHASE EXTRACTION OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS WITH HYPERCROSSLINKED SORBENTS
14.1 Why pre-concentration is needed? 14.2. Basic principle of solid-phase extraction 14.3. SPE pre-concentration of phenolic compounds 14.4. SPE trace enrichment of pesticides 14.5. SPE trace enrichment of pharmaceuticals 14.6. SPE enrichment of organic compounds from biological liquids 14.7. SPE in food analysis 14.8. SPE enrichment of organic acids 14.9. SPE enrichment of miscellaneous compounds 14.10. Hypercrosslinked polystyrene sorbents versus Oasis HLB 14.11. ?-?-Interactions and SPE from non-aqueous media 14.12. Pre-concentration of volatile organic compounds in air

15. HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYSTYRENE AS HEMOSORBENTS
15.1. Hemoperfusion vs hemodialysis in blood purification 15.2. Hypercrosslinked polymers for the removal of b2-microglobulin 15.3. Biocompatibility of hypercrosslinked polystyrene: in vitro and in vivo studies 15.4. Clinical studies 15.5. Further perspectives for hemoperfusion on hypercrosslinked sorbents

16. HYPERCROSSLINKED ION EXCHANGE RESINS
16.1. Ion exchange capacity and swelling behavior of hypercrosslinked strong acidic ion exchange resins 16.2. Kinetics of ion exchange on hypercrosslinked resins 16.3. Selectivity of ion exchange on hypercrosslinked strong acidic cation exchange resins 16.4. Porosity of dry hypercrosslinked strong acidic ion exchange resins 16.5. Anion exchange resins 16.6. Properties of commercial hypercrosslinked ion exchange resins

17. OTHER APPLICATIONS OF HYPERCROSSLINKED POLYSTYRENE
17.1. Extraction of rhenium by impregnated hypercrosslinked sorbents 17.2. Heterogeneous membranes filled with hypercrosslinked polystyrene 17.3. Nanocomposite catalysts of organic reactions 17.4. Storage of hydrogen and methane on hypercrosslinked polystyrene 17.5. Carbonaceous sorbents based on hypercrosslinked polystyrene

To find similar publications, click on a keyword below:
adsorbants : chemistry : hypercrosslinked polymers : plastics & polymers : super adsorbers : synthesis, chemical

Terms & Conditions | Privacy Statement

Last Modified 16/12/2013 © CPL Scientific Publishing Services Limited

Search this site Environment Ecology Energy Bioproducts Food Biotechnology Agriculture Biocontrol & IPM Life Sciences Chemistry Business