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Handbook of waste management and co-product recovery in food processing (Volume 2)

Edited by K W Waldron 
Woodhead  October 2009  



Hardcover  680 pp  ISBN 9781845693916      £180.00
  • Provides essential information about the major issues and technologies involved in waste product valorisation
  • examines methods to reduce water and energy consumption in partciular food industry sectors
  • discusses the economic and legislative drivers for waste management and co-product recovery

Food processors are under pressure, both from consumers and legislation, to reduce the amount of waste they produce and to consume water and energy more efficiently. Handbook of waste management and co-product recovery in food processing provides essential information about the major issues and technologies involved in waste co-product valorisation, methods to reduce water and energy consumption, waste reduction in particular food industry sectors and end waste management.

Opening chapters in Part one of Volume 2 cover economic and legislative drivers for waste management and co-product recovery. Part two discusses life cycle analysis and closed-loop production systems to minimise environmental impacts in food production. It also includes chapters on water and energy use as well as sustainable packaging. Part three reviews methods for exploiting co-products as food and feed ingredients, whilst the final part of the book discusses techniques for non-food exploitation of co-products from food processing.

Contents

PART 1 ECONOMIC AND LEGISLATIVE DRIVERS FOR WASTE MANAGEMENT AND CO-PRODUCT RECOVERY

Sustainable value stream mapping in the food industry, A Norton, Imperial College London and A Fearne, University of Kent, UK
- Background - The lean paradigm - Value stream mapping - Environmental issues and the lean paradigm - Sustainable value stream mapping - Extending sustainable value stream mapping to include other environmental performance indicators - Mapping of environmental performance indicators - Example of the application of extended sustainable value stream mapping - Difficulties in applying sustainable value stream mapping and possible solutions - Conclusions - Acknowledgements - References

Economics of food waste co-product exploitation, B Gremmen, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
- Introduction - Legislative drivers of food waste co-product exploitation in the EU - Two examples of cost/benefit analysis in food waste co-product exploitation - Future trends - References

Regulatory requirements for valorisation of food-chain co-products in the European Union, H L Heeres, TNO Quality of Life, The Netherlands
- Introduction - Assessment of permissibility - Assessment model for regulatory acceptance - Legislation regarding permissibility of input substances - Legislation regarding permissibility of additions - Legislation regarding permissibility of output substances - Legislation regarding processing - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 2 ENVIRONMENTAL SYSTEMS ANALYSIS AND CLOSED-LOOP FACTORIES

Application of life cycle assessment (LCA) in reducing waste and develop co-products in food processing, U Sonesson, SIK - The Swedish Institute for Food and Biotechnology, Sweden
- Introduction - Key drivers for using environmental systems analysis in planning of food waste reduction and co-product exploitation strategies - Life cycle assessment (LCA) - Examples of environmental systems analysis in food waste reduction and co-product exploitation strategies - Future trends - References

Use of life-cycle assessment (LCA) to ecodesign a food product, J Zufia, L Arana and S Ramos, AZTI-Tecnalia, Spain
- Introduction - Methodology, key factors and main strategies to ecodesign a food product - Future trends - A brief case study - References

Closed-loop production for waste reduction in food processing, K Östergren, SIK - The Swedish Institute for Food and Biotechnology, Sweden
- Introduction - Key reason for reducing waste - Technologies for closed-loop factories - Industry examples - Future trends - Sources for further information and advice - References

Step change towards net zero environmental impact in food processing: the closed-loop approach, R Poynton, Independent Consultant, UK
- Introduction - Working definitions - Background: productive change in food processing - Step change towards net zero: the single plant - Step change towards net zero: whole systems - Example: Closed loop trials with remanufactured plastics packaging materials - Expected future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Water footprint, water recycling and food industry supply chains, J J Klemes, P S Varbanov and H L Lam, University of Pannonia, Hungary
- Introduction - Water footprint (WFP) and life cycle assessment (LCA) in the food industry - Regional energy supply chain/water total site - Simultaneous minimisation of energy and water - Technologies and techniques for water recycling - Water integration and water minimization - References

Hygienic and sustainable use and reuse of water and energy in food factories, D Napper, Euroteknik Limited, I Bulatov and J-K Kim, The University of Manchester, UK
- Introduction: water and energy use in food industries - Sustainable energy and water use and recycling in food industries - Process integration for effluent treatment and product recovery - Combined energy and water minimization - Recovery of organic materials from process water - Sources for further information and advice - References

Technologies to reduce refrigeration energy consumption in the food industry, J Evans, University of Bristol, UK
- Introduction: refrigeration energy consumption in the food industry - Key drivers for reducing energy consumption in the food industry - Refrigeration systems in the food industry - Process optimization - New or alternative refrigeration methods and systems - Equipment operation and optimization - Structure of refrigerated rooms - New refrigeration systems - Heat recovery - Future refrigeration technologies - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Sustainable food packaging, G L Robertson, University of Queensland and Food · Packaging · Environment, Australia
- Role of food packaging - Definitions of sustainability and sustainable development - Sustainable packaging definitions - Guidelines, metrics and tools for design of sustainable packaging - Market size and predicted growth of sustainable food packaging - Key drivers for development of sustainable food packaging - Food packaging, waste management and sustainability - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 3 EXPLOITATION OF CO-PRODUCTS AS FOOD AND FEED INGREDIENTS

Enzymes for the valorisation of fruit- and vegetable-based co-products, E Bonnin, M-C Ralet and J-F Thibault, INRA, France and H A Schols, Wageningen University, The Netherlands
- Introduction - Economical and environmental key reasons for upgrading fruit- and vegetable-based co-products - Structural and compositional major obstacles - Enzymes potentially involved in the degradation of fruit- and vegetable-based co-products - Targeted enzymatic treatments for upgrading fruit and vegetable-based co-products - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

A modular strategy for processing of fruit and vegetable wastes into value-added products, G Laufenberg, Bayer BioScience GmbH and Technical University Berlin and N Schulze, University of Bonn, Germany
- Introduction - Strategy for the development of multifunctional food ingredients based on vegetable residues: the upgrading concept - Synchronization of all product streams for improved utilization of organic residues - Selected examples of the sustainability concept in practice - Oil press cake for decalactone aroma generation - Adsorption of ecotoxic chemicals employing vegetable bioadsorbents - Multifunctional food ingredients in novel products - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - Further reading - References

Conversion of fruit and vegetable processing wastes into value-added products through solid-state fermentation, G Laufenberg, Bayer BioScience GmbH and Technical University Berlin and N Schulze, University of Bonn, Germany
- Introduction - The conversion process using solid-state fermentation - Bioconversion to flavours by solid-state fermentation - Biotechnical enzyme production using vegetable residues - References

The production of high-value functional vegetable juices from food co-products, P S R Kosters, Provalor BV, The Netherlands and K W Waldron, Institute of Food Research, UK
- Introduction - Sourcing of raw materials - Market opportunities - Technology and processing - Chain integration - Sustainability - Acknowledgements - References

Food industry co-products as animal feeds, R Crawshaw, RC Feed, UK
- Introduction - Key features - Legislative restrictions - Examples of food processing that produce co-products that can be used as animal feeds - Quality assurance - Additional processing - Information sources - References

Vegetable and cereal protein exploitation for fish feed, C Erasmus, CSIR Biosciences, South Africa
- Introduction - Key drivers for exploiting food waste co-products - Technologies for vegetable protein exploitation as fish feed - Identification of research gaps - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 4 NON-FOOD EXPLOITATION OF WASTES AND CO-PRODUCTS

Processing of used cooking oil for the production of biofuels, R L Skelton, University of Cambridge, UK
- Introduction - Driving forces - Used cooking oils as a feedstock - Conversion technology - Direct use in engines - Conclusions and future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Use of crop residues in the production of biofuel, R Lal, The Ohio State University, USA
- Introduction - Types of biofuels and sources of feedstock - Crop residues as biofuel feedstock - Multiple and competing uses of crop residues and other agricultural co-products - Biofuels as myth or reality? - Competition for land, water and nutrients - Can biofuel displace fossil fuel? - Potential of biofuels as alternative to fossil fuel - Conclusions - References

Carbohydrate-based food processing wastes as biomass for biorefining of biofuels and chemicals, B Kamm, Research Institute Bioactive Polymer Systems e.V. and Brandenburg University of Technology Cottbus, Germany
- Introduction - Raw material biomass - Potential of waste in agri-food chains - Principles of biorefineries - The role of biotechnology for production of platform chemicals - Model building blocks - The role of chemistry for production of platform chemicals - Biorefinery technologies and biorefinery systems - Future trends - References

Production of green bioplastics from agri-food chain residues and co-products, J Yu, University of Hawaii, USA
- Potential of bioplastics - Key drivers for exploiting agri-food chain co-products in polyhydroxyalkanoates production - Technologies of using agri-food chain co-products in production of polyhydroxyalkanoates bioplastics - Future trends - References

Bioadsorbents from fruit and vegetable processing residues for wastewater treatment, G Laufenberg, Bayer BioScience GmbH and Technical University Berlin, Germany
- Improvements in the functionality of bioadsorbents for waste water treatment - Combining vegetable residues with binding mechanisms for efficient adsorption - Effect of particle size on adsorption - Adsorbent dosage - Contaminants - Initial concentration - Agitation and contact time - Effect of pH on adsorption - Targeted metabolic breakdown - The effect of surface area on adsorption - Binding mechanisms - Conclusion - References

Recycling and upgrading of bone meal for environmentally-friendly crop protection and nutrition: the PROTECTOR project, E Someus, 3R Group - TERRA HUMANA Clean Technology Development Ltd, Hungary
- Introduction - Environmental concerns of intensive crop production - Phosphorous fertilization - The characteristics of food and meat industrial by-products - The PROTECTOR project: development of an effective biofertilizer product using bone meal and other food processing by-products - Technology and scale-up - Commercial field cultivation tests for validation and demonstration of PROTECTOR agronomic and nutrition effectiveness - Discussion of effects of PROTECTOR products - Protecting soil resources and combating global climate change - Conclusion - Sources of further information and advice - References

Composting of food-chain waste for agricultural and horticultural use, K W Waldron, Institute of Food Research and E M Nichols, The Association for Organics Recycling, UK
- Introduction - Types of waste that are commonly composted - Controlling composting - Uses of compost - Compost quality and €product€ status - Final considerations - Acknowledgements - References

To find similar publications, click on a keyword below:
European Union : Woodhead Publishing Ltd : animal feed : biofuels : business & management : composting : fermentation : food science : handbooks : life cycle analysis : packaging : refrigeration : regulations : sustainable development : technology : waste treatment : water science

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