Home


Handbook of water and energy management in food processing

Edited by J Klemes and R Smith and J-K Kim 
Woodhead Publishing  June 2008  



Hardcover  1056 pp  ISBN 9781845691950      £240.00
  • provides an overview of key drivers for better management
  • reviews techniques for improvements in efficiency of water and energy use and waste water treatment
  • examines house keeping proceedures and measurement and process control
  • chapters detail improvements in specific processes such as refrigeration, drying and heat recovery
  • highlights paticular industry sectors including fresh meat, cereals, soft drinks and brewing

Effective water and energy use in food processing is essential, not least for legislative compliance and cost reduction. This major volume reviews techniques for improvements in the efficiency of water and energy use as well as wastewater treatment in the food industry.

Opening chapters provide an overview of key drivers for better management. Part two is concerned with assessing water and energy consumption and designing strategies for their reduction. These include auditing energy and water use, and modelling and optimisation tools for water minimisation. Part three reviews good housekeeping procedures, measurement and process control, and monitoring and intelligent support systems. Part four discusses methods to minimise energy consumption. Chapters focus on improvements in specific processes such as refrigeration, drying and heat recovery. Part five discusses water reuse and wastewater treatment in the food industry. Chapters cover water recycling, disinfection techniques, aerobic and anaerobic systems for treatment of wastewater. The final section concentrates on particular industry sectors including fresh meat and poultry, cereals, sugar, soft drinks, brewing and winemaking.

With its distinguished editors and international team of contributors, Handbook of water and energy management in food processing will be a standard reference for the food industry.

Contents

PART 1 KEY DRIVERS TO IMPROVE WATER AND ENERGY MANAGEMENT IN FOOD PROCESSING

Legislation and economic issues regarding water and energy management in food processing P Cooke, Water Ltd, UK
- Introduction - Trends in, and overview of, legislation - Economic drivers as an alternative to prosecution - Implications of legislative and economic drivers for management - Aspects of boiler management - Generic procedure for assessing the economics of effluent treatment and water reuse projects - Summary - Sources of further information and advice - References

Environmental and consumer issues regarding water and energy management in food processing D Elkin and C Stevens, MSA, UK
- Introduction - The scale of water and energy consumption in food processing - Financial costs to food companies - Environmental impacts and costs - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Towards a complex approach to waste treatment in food processing P Stehlik, Brno University of Technology € VUT UPEI, Czech Republic
- Introduction - Waste in food processing - Approaches to food waste treatment - Selection of waste treatment technology - Examples of efficient approaches - Future trends - Conclusions - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 2 ASSESSING WATER AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION AND DESIGNING STRATEGIES FOR THEIR REDUCTION

Auditing energy and water use in the food industry P Navarri and S Bédard, Natural Resources Canada, Canada
- Introduction to energy and water auditing - Process mapping and energy and water use inventories - Identification of energy and water saving opportunities - Cost-benefit analysis - Conclusion - Sources of further information and advice - References

Methods to minimise water use in food processing J-K Kim and R Smith, The University of Manchester, UK
- Introduction - Water Minimisation - Water reuse and recycling - Process changes for water minimisation - Application in the food industry - Summary - Sources of further information and advice - References

Methods to minimise energy use in food processing J Klemes, University of Pannonia, Hungary (formerly The University of Manchester, UK) and S Perry, The University of Manchester, UK
- Introduction: energy use in food processing - Minimising energy use in food processing - Energy saving and minimisation: process integration/pinch technology, combined heat and power, combined energy and water minimisation - Overview of selected case studies - Case studies and examples of energy saving using pinch technology and heat integration - Further studies - Sources of further information and advice - References

Modelling and optimisation tools for water minimisation in the food industry F Friedler and P Varbanov, University of Pannonia, Hungary
- Introduction - Framework for model building and optimisation - Optimisation: meaning and mathematical formulation - Creating models - Example: an overview of an industrial case study - Sources of further information and advice - References

Energy management methods for the food industry F Marechal and D Muller, Ecole Polytechnique Fédérale de Lausanne, Switzerland
- Introduction - The top-down approach: from the bill to the production - The bottom-up approach: from efficient production to the bill - Assessing the energy savings options - Conclusions - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - Acknowledgements - References

Minimising water and energy use in the batch and semi-continuous processes in the food and beverage industry L Puigjaner, A Espuńa and M Almató, Universitat Politčcnica de Catalunya, Spain
- Introduction - Method for water use minimisation - General modeling framework - Mathematical formulation - Energy integration opportunities - Solving the model - Model optimisation - Software prototype - Industrial applications - Final considerations and future trends - Nomenclature - Sources of further information and advice - Acknowledgements - References

Novel methods for combined energy and water minimisation in the food industry L Savulescu, Natural Resources Canada, Canada and J-K Kim, The University of Manchester, UK
- Introduction - Literature review on simultaneous energy and water minimisation - Conceptual understanding and physical insights - Design methodology - Summary - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 3 GOOD HOUSEKEEPING PROCEDURES, MEASUREMENT AND PROCESS CONTROL TO MINIMISE WATER AND ENERGY CONSUMPTION

Good housekeeping procedures to improve efficiency of water use in food processing plants R Pagan and N Price, The University of Queensland, Australia
- Introduction - Better management practices - Monitoring water use - Cleaning - Utilities - Auxiliaries - Unit operations - Trends in food processing - Sources of further information and advice - References

Housekeeping measures to reduce energy consumption in food processing plants R Pagan, N Price and J Gaffel, The University of Queensland, Australia
- Introduction - Reducing cleaning requirements to save energy - Reducing waste to save energy - Maintenance and monitoring of unit operations to save energy - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Measurement and process control for water and energy use in the food industry P Seferlis, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece and S Voutetakis, Centre for Research and Technology € Hellas, Greece
- Introduction - Measurements and sensors in the food industry - Process control for water and energy in the food industry - System integration - Conclusions and future trends € sources of further information and advice - References

Monitoring and intelligent support systems to optimise water and energy use T Zhelev, University of Limerick, Ireland
- Introduction - Intelligent systems for process operation support - Diagnostics - Monitoring for better control - Agent-based monitoring - Links to supply chain management - Links with life-cycle management - Monitoring and analysis - Monitoring and forecasting for energy efficiency improvement - Tendencies - Application of monitoring and intelligent support for decision making - Monitoring for optimal energy and water consumption - Introducing integrated management of resources and finances - Concluding remarks - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 4 METHODS TO MINIMISE ENERGY CONSUMPTION IN FOOD PROCESSING, RETAIL AND WASTE TREATMENT

Minimising energy consumption associated with chilling, refrigerated storage and cooling systems in the food industry J Evans, University of Bristol, UK
- Introduction - Energy used in chilling/freezing and storage of food - Refrigeration system efficiency - Refrigeration system component efficiency - Efficiency of heat extraction from food and temperature maintenance during storage - Construction and usage of refrigerated areas - Life-cycle costs and analysis - Energy target and monitoring - Energy minimisation through integrated heating and cooling systems - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Minimising energy consumption associated with drying, baking and evaporation M Marcotte and S Grabowski, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada
- Introduction - General energy accounting methods - Drying - Baking - Evaporation - Final remarks - sources of further information and advice - References

Minimising energy consumption associated with retorting R Simpson and S Almonacid, Universidad Técnica Federico Santa María, Chile
- Introduction - Retort operation - Modeling and optimisation of energy consumption - Simultaneous processing of different product lots in the same retort - New package systems and their impact on energy consumption - Future trends - Nomenclature - Sources of further information and advice - References

Heat recovery in the food industry D Reay, David Reay & Associates, UK
- Introduction - Chapter themes - Recovering waste heat at source - The uses for waste heat € the sink - The site survey € quantifying waste heat - Types of heat recovery equipment - Heat/cold storage (or thermal energy storage € TES) - Process integration - Case studies - Sources of further information and advice - Summary - References

Fouling of heat transfer equipment in the food industry B Thonon, Greth, France
- Introduction - Fouling mechanisms - Waterside fouling - Process-side fouling - Conclusion - Nomenclature - Sources of further information and advice - References

Reduction of refrigeration energy consumption and environmental impacts in food retailing S Tassou and Y Ge, Brunel University, UK
- Introduction - Refrigeration systems in food retailing - Recent research and development to reduce the environmental impacts of supermarket refrigeration systems - CO2 refrigeration systems for supermarket applications - Opportunities for energy savings in supermarket refrigeration - Sources of further information and advice - Conclusions - Acknowledgements - References

Dewatering for food waste V Orsat and G S V Raghavan, McGill University, Canada
- Introduction - Waste conditioning - Thickening - Dewatering methods - Combining dewatering methods - An environmental and economic choice - Conclusions and future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 5 WATER REUSE AND WASTEWATER TREATMENT IN THE FOOD INDUSTRY

Feedwater requirements in the food industry P Glavic and M Simonic, University of Maribor, Slovenia
- Introduction - Future trends - Water supply - Feed water pre-treatment processes - Sources of further information and advice - Summary - References

Water recycling in the food industry V Sethu and V A Viramuthu, University of Nottingham, Malaysia
- Introduction - The food processing industry - Water in food processing plants - Water recycling technologies - Water purity standards - Water recycling opportunities - Water conservation measures - Designing a water recycling scheme - Benefits and drawbacks of water recycling - Case studies - Conclusions and future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Advances in membrane technology for the treatment and reuse of food processing wastewater E Nagy, University of Pannonia, Hungary
- Introduction - Membrane separation processes - Membrane bioreactor - Biofilm membrane bioreactor - Applications in food processing wastewater treatment - Conclusions and future trends - Sources of further information and advice - Acknowledgement - Appendix - References

Advances in disinfection techniques for water reuse L Forney, Georgia Institute of Technology, USA
Introduction. Continuous disinfection process. Chemical and physical disinfection. Future trends. Sources of information and advice. References.

Advances in aerobic systems for treatment of food processing wastewater J R Taricska, Hole Montes Inc., Y-T Hung, Cleveland State University, K H Li, Texas Hospital Association, USA
- Introduction - Continuous disinfection process - Chemical and physical disinfection - Future trends - Sources of information and advice - References

Advances in anaerobic systems for organic pollution removal from food processing wastewater K-Y Show, Cleveland State University, USA, P Kajitvichyanukul, King Mongkut€s University of Technology Thonburi, Thailand and L K Wang, Lenox Institute of Water Technology, USA
- Introduction - Food processing wastewater Characteristics - Anaerobic treatment for food processing wastewater - Types of anaerobic treatment for food processing wastewater - Controlling the anaerobic digestion process - Modelling of the anaerobic process for food processing wastewater - Future trend: methane and hydrogen production from anaerobic process using food processing wastewater - Sources of further information and advice - References

Seafood wastewater treatment K Y Show, University Tunku Abdul Rahman, Malaysia
- Introduction - Characteristics of seafood wastewater - Primary treatment - Biological treatment - Physicochemical treatment - Land application of seafood wastewater - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

PART 6 WATER AND ENERGY MINIMISATION IN PARTICULAR INDUSTRY SECTORS

Water and energy management in the slaughterhouse I Genné and An Derden, VITO, Belgium
- Introduction - Water and energy use in slaughterhouses - Water and energy saving options - Sources of further information and advice - References

Water and energy management in poultry processing C Burton, Cemagref, France and D Tinker, Dave Tinker and Associates, UK
- Current water and energy uses in the industry - Current water and energy use: How much water and energy is used and why - Measuring, monitoring, analysis and strategies - Reducing energy consumption in each part of the process - Waste management and renewable energy - Reducing water consumption in each part of the process - Water recycling - Conclusions - Sources of further information and advice - References

Water and energy management in cereals processing G Campbell and F Mateos-Salvador, The University of Manchester, UK
- Introduction - Overview of water and energy use in the cereals processing industries - Mixing, baking, drying and cooling of farinaceous products - Corn wet milling and starch processing - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Water and energy management in the sugar industry K Urbaniec, Warsaw University of Technology, Poland and J Klemes, University of Pannonia, Hungary
- Introduction - Sugar production from sugar beet and sugar cane - Identification of opportunities to improve energy and water use in sugar production - Energy and water minimisation: process integration/pinch technology and other optimisation techniques - Retrofitting the energy sub-system for reduced energy consumption - Retrofitting the water and wastewater sub-system for reduced water consumption - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Improving energy efficiency in sugar processing F Lorenz, Südzucker, Germany
- Introduction - The sugar industry - What are the reasons for energy demand? Combined heat and power station - Heat losses - Heating - Evaporation - Drying - Limits - Output/input ratio - Future trends - Sources of further information and advice - References

Water minimisation in the soft drinks industry T Majozi, University of Pretoria, South Africa and D C Y Foo, University of Nottingham, Malaysia
- Introduction - Current trends in wastewater minimisation in the continuous processing industry - Current trends in wastewater minimisation in the batch processing industry - Background on water usage in soft drinks industries - Case study 1: the case study on amalgamated beverage industries (ABI), South Africa - Case study 2: water recycling by floating media filtration and nanofiltration at a Japanese soft drink factory (Miyaki et al., 2000) - Conclusions - Acknowledgements - Sources for further information and advice - References

Brewing, winemaking and distilling: an overview of wastewater treatment and utilisation schemes L Fillaudeau, LISBP INRA UMR792, A Bories, INRA UE999 and M Decloux, AgroParisTech UMR1145, France
- Introduction - Water use: the origin and nature of effluents in the brewing, wine and distilling industries - Most widely used treatment methods: livestock feed, discharge, anaerobic and aerobic treatments, incineration - Alternative treatments and re-engineering processes with the best available techniques (BAT) approach: industrial reality and alternative treatments - Acknowledgements - Nomenclature - References

To find similar publications, click on a keyword below:
Woodhead Publishing Ltd : energy : food science : handbooks : water science

Terms & Conditions | Privacy Statement

Last Modified 16/12/2013 © CPL Scientific Publishing Services Limited

Search this site Environment Ecology Energy Bioproducts Food Biotechnology Agriculture Biocontrol & IPM Life Sciences Chemistry Business