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Delivery and controlled release of bioactives in foods and nutraceuticals

Edited by N Garti 
Woodhead  January 2008  



Hardcover  496 pp  ISBN 9781845691455      £160.00
  • reviews techniques to optimise the delivery and release of bioactives in food
  • discusses the factors that affect nutrient bioavailability and methods to test delivery system efficacy
  • addresses materials used and specific techniques for delivery and release
  • covers regulatory issues and future trends in bioactives and nutraceuticals

Active ingredients in foods must remain fully functional for as long as necessary and be transported and discharged appropriately to have the desired nutritional effect. Delivery and controlled release systems are an essential way to achieve these aims. This important book reviews how to optimise these systems to maximise the health-promoting properties of food products.

Opening chapters review factors affecting nutrient bioavailability and methods to test delivery system efficacy. Part two addresses materials used and specific techniques for delivery and release. The benefits and drawbacks of structured lipids, micro- and nano-emulsions, food-protein-derived materials, complexes and conjugates of biopolymers, and starch as an encapsulation material for delivery of functional food ingredients, are all considered. Part three discusses the delivery and controlled release of particular nutraceuticals such as antioxidants and vitamins, folic acid, probiotics, fish oils and proteins. Part four covers regulatory issues and future trends in bioactives and nutraceuticals.

Edited by a leading expert in the field, Delivery and controlled release of bioactives in foods and nutraceuticals will be a valuable reference for those working in the food industry and particularly those developing nutraceuticals.

Contents

PART 1 THE EFFECTIVENESS OF CONTROLLED RELEASE AND DELIVERY SYSTEMS

Assessing the bioavailability of nutraceuticals, R M Faulks and S Southon, Institute of Food Research, UK
Introduction. Measuring absorption, metabolism and tissue targeting. Study design and interpretation. Other considerations. Health response. Implications of controlled absorption for product development. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

Structure of the gastrointestinal mucus layer and implications for controlled release and delivery of functional food ingredients, G Lafitte, Centre for Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sweden
Introduction. Understanding the structure of the gastro-intestinal mucus layer. Implications of the mucin molecules and the mucus layer in controlled release and delivery of functional food ingredients. Conclusion. Acknowledgements. References.

Testing the effectiveness of nutrient delivery systems, E Acosta, University of Toronto, Canada
Introduction: A holistic view of delivery systems. Delivery systems: formulation, processing and post-processing. In vivo tests. In vitro tests. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

Lyotropic liquid crystals as delivery vehicles for food ingredients, J Barauskas and T Nylander, Lund University, Sweden
Introduction. Lyotropic lipid liquid crystals. Lamellar phase colloids. Nonlamellar liquid crystalline lipid-based nanoparticles. Future trends. Acknowledgements. References.

PART 2 MATERIALS AND TECHNIQUES FOR CONTROLLED RELEASE AND DELIVERY OF NUTRIENTS

Structured lipids as delivery systems, E Hernandez, OmegaPure Technology and Innovation Center, USA
Introduction Synthesis of structured lipids. Nutrition, absorption, transport and metabolism of structured lipids. Foods applications of structured lipids. Structured lipids in drug delivery. References.

Micro- and nano-emulsions for delivery of functional food ingredients, N Garti and I Yuli-Amar, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Introduction. Microemulsions. Loaded microemulsions. Bioavailability of nutraceuticals. Microemulsions as microreactors. Conclusions. References.

Emulsion droplet interfacial engineering to deliver bioactive lipids into functional foods, L A Shaw, H Faraji, T Aoki, D Djordjevic, D J McClements and E A Decker, University of Massachusetts, USA
Introduction. Dietary w-3 fatty acids. Dietary w-3 fatty acids and health. Potential for w-3 fatty acids in functional foods. Mechanisms of lipid oxidation. Lipid oxidation in emulsions. Interfacial engineering. Electrostatic layering in oil-in-water emulsions. Microencapsulation of oil-in-water emulsion systems. Emulsion droplet engineering to stabilize w-3 fatty acids. Conclusions. References.

Lipid self-assembled particles for the delivery of nutraceuticals, O Ramon and D Danino, Technion Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Introduction. Structure and properties of lipids. Self-assembly and microstructure of lipid systems. Liposomes. Cubic and hexagonal mesophases and their dispersed nanoparticles. Future trends. References.

Complexes and conjugates of biopolymers for delivery of bioactive ingredients via food, Y D Livney, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Introduction. Complexes and coacervates. Conjugates - covalently bonded biopolymers. Complexes of a protein with a polysaccharide-protein-conjugate. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

Food-protein-derived materials and their use as carriers and delivery systems for active food components, M Subirade and L Chen, Laval University, Canada
Introduction. Food protein hydrogels and related networks as nutraceutical carriers. Food protein micro- and nano-particles. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. Acknowledgement. References.

Starch as an encapsulation material to control digestion rate in the delivery of active food components, E Shimoni, Technion - Israel Institute of Technology, Israel
Introduction. Uses of starch to control delivery in microencapsulation. Starch as nanoencapsulation material. Conclusion. References.

PART 3 DELIVERY AND CONTROLLED RELEASE OF PARTICULAR NUTRACEUTICALS

Encapsulation and controlled release of antioxidants and vitamins, C M Sabliov and C E Astete, Louisiana State University Agricultural Center, USA
Introduction. Antioxidants and vitamins in protecting human health. Advantages of encapsulation over traditional delivery methods. Top-down techniques used for encapsulation of antioxidants and vitamins in polymeric nanoparticles. Characterization methods. Controlled release of antioxidants and vitamins. Conclusions. Future trends. References.

Encapsulation and controlled release of folic acid, K Kailasapathy, University of Western Sydney, Australia
Introduction. Encapsulation technologies for folates. Controlled release of folate in the gastrointestinal system. Applications in functional foods. Future trends. References.

Encapsulation of probiotics, C P Champagne, Agriculture and Agri-Food Canada, Canada and K Kailasapathy, University of Western Sydney, Australia
Introduction. Encapsulation technologies for probiotics. Applications in nutraceuticals. Applications in functional foods. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

Encapsulation of fish oils, S-J Lee, Massey University, New Zealand and D Y Ying, HortResearch, New Zealand
Introduction. Encapsulation technologies used to deliver fish oils. Using encapsulated fish oils in food products. Suppliers of microencapsulated fish oil powder. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

Encapsulation approaches for proteins, A Millqvist-Fureby, YKI, Sweden
Introduction. Solid formulations for proteins. Surface formation in drying. Coating in spray-drying. Polyelectrolyte microcapsules for protein encapsulation. Summary and future trends. References.

PART 4 REGULATORY ISSUES AND FUTURE TRENDS

Regulatory aspects of nutrient delivery systems, E Acosta, University of Toronto, Canada
Introduction. Selection of ingredients. Stability of the product. Bioavailability of the active ingredient. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

The future of controlled release and delivery technologies, N Garti, The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, Israel
Introduction. The food additives. Bioavailability and performance the need for new vehicles. Bioavailability. Nanoscience, nanovehicles, and controlled release. Specific targets. The future of controlled release systems. Encapsulation with organogels and lyotropic liquid crystals. Reactivity at interfaces. Conclusions. References.

To find similar publications, click on a keyword below:
Woodhead Publishing Ltd : encapsulation : food science : lipids : nutraceuticals : plant nutrition : regulations : starch

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