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The microwave processing of foods

Edited by H Schubert and M Regier 
Woodhead  2005  



Hardback  360 pp  ISBN 9781855739642      £155.00
  • reviews recent research on how microwave processing affects particular foods
  • discusses how this technology can be optimised for the food industry
  • an assortment of examples are used to illustrate key points
  • written and edited by an international team of experts
With such advantages as more rapid heating and preservation of sensory and nutritional quality, microwave processing has proved a versatile technology. This important book reviews the wealth of recent research on how this technology affects particular foods and how it can be optimised for the food industry.

Part 1 discusses current research on how microwaves interact with the dielectric properties of foods and reviews its effects on nutritional and sensory quality. Building on this foundation, the range of applications of microwave processing from baking and drying to blanching, thawing and tempering are reviewed. It also looks at packaging issues. The final part of the book covers the key area of process measurement and control to ensure more uniform heating of food products.

With its distinguished editors and international team of contributors, The microwave processing of foods will be a standard reference for all those wishing to maximise the benefits of this important technology.

Contents

PART 1 PRINCIPLES

Introducing microwave processing of food: principles and technologies, M Regier, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition and H Schubert, University of Karlsruhe, Germany
Introduction. Definitions and regulatory framework. Electromagnetic theory. Microwave technology. Summary. Notation. References.

Dielectric properties of foods, J Tang, Washington State University, USA
Introduction. Dielectric properties of foods: general characteristics. Factors influencing dielectric properties. Dielectric properties of selected foods. Sources of further information and future trends. References.

Measuring the dielectric properties of foods, M Regier, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition and H Schubert, University of Karlsruhe, Germany
Introduction. Measurement techniques: closed structures. Measurement techniques: open structures. Further analysis of dielectric properties. Summary. Nomenclature. References.

Microwave heating and the dielectric properties of foods, V Meda, University of Saskatchewan and V Orsat and G Raghavan, McGill University, Canada
Introduction. Microwave heating and the dielectric properties of foods. Microwave interactions with dielectric properties. Measuring microwave heating. Microwave heating variables. Product formulation to optimise microwave heating. Future trends. References.

Microwave processing, nutritional and sensory quality, M Brewer, University of Illinois, USA
Introduction. Microwave interactions with food components. Drying and finishing fruits, vegetables and herbs. Blanching and cooling fruits, vegetables and herbs. Dough systems. Meat. Flavor and browning. References.

PART 2 APPLICATIONS

Microwave technology for food processing: an overview, V Orsat and G Raghavan, McGill University and V Meda, University of Saskatchewan, Canada
Introduction. Industrial microwave applicators. Applications. Future trends. References.

Baking using microwave processing, G Sumnu and S Sahin, Middle East Technical University, Turkey
Introduction. Principles of microwave baking. Technologies and equipment for microwave baking. Strengths and weaknesses of microwave baking. Interaction of microwaves with major baking ingredients. Application of microwave baking to particular foods. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

Drying using microwave processing, U Erle, Nestlé Product Technology Centre, Germany
Introduction. What is the quality of microwave dried food products? Combining microwave drying with other dehydration methods. Microwave drying applied in the food industry. Modelling microwave drying. References.

Blanching using microwave processing, L Dorantes-Alvarez, Instituto Politécnico Nacional and L Parada-Dorantes, Universidad del Caribe, Mexico
Introduction. Blanching and enzyme inactivation. Comparing traditional and microwave blanching. Applications of microwave blanching to particular foods. Strengths of microwave blanching. Weaknesses of microwave blanching. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

Thawing and tempering using microwave processing, M Swain and S James, Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre, UK
Introduction. Conventional thawing and tempering systems. Electrical methods. Modelling of microwave thawing. Commercial systems. Conclusions and possible future trends. References.

Packaging for microwave foods, R Schiffmann, R F Schiffmann Associates Inc., USA
Introduction. Factors affecting temperature distribution in microwaved foods. Passive containers. Packaging materials. Active containers. Future trends. References.


PART 3 MEASUREMENT AND PROCESS CONTROL
Measuring the heating performance of microwave ovens, M Swain and S James, Food Refrigeration and Process Engineering Research Centre, UK
Introduction. Factors affecting food heating: power output. Factors affecting food heating: reheating performance. Methodology for identifying cooking/reheating procedure. Determining the heating performance characteristics of microwave ovens. Conclusions and future trends. References.

Measuring temperature distributions during microwave processing, K Knoerzer, University of Karlsruhe, M Regier, Federal Research Centre for Nutrition, and H Schubert, University of Karlsruhe, Germany
Introduction. Methods of measuring temperature distributions. Physical principles of different temperature mapping methods. Measurement in practice: MRI anaylsis of microwave-induced heating patterns. Conclusions. References.

Improving microwave process control, P Püschner, Püschner GmbH and Co., Germany
Introduction. General design issues for industrial microwave plants. Process control systems. Examples of process control systems in food processing. Future trends. References.

Maximising uniform heat distribution in microwave heating, B Wäppling-Raaholt and T Ohlsson, SIK, The Swedish Institute for Food and Biotechnology, Sweden
Introduction. Heat distribution and uniformity in microwave processing. Heating effects related to uniformity. Examples of applications related to heating uniformity. Modelling of microwave processes as a tool for improving heating uniformity. Techniques for improving heating uniformity. Applications to particular foods/processes. Future trends. Sources of further information and advice. References.

Simulation of microwave heating processes, K Knoerzer, M Reiger and H Schubert, Institute of Food Process Engineering, University of Karlsruhe, Germany
Introduction. Modelling techniques and capable software packages. Examples of simulated microwave heating. Future trends. References.

To find similar publications, click on a keyword below:
Woodhead Publishing Ltd : food safety : food science : heat generation : microwave processing : process engineering : sterilisation

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